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Fears Dredging To Blame For Sick Fish

by 5m Editor
21 September 2011, at 1:00am

AUSTRALIA - Fisheries Queensland has banned fishing for three weeks in the city's harbour, after barramundi and bream were found with sores, rashes and infected eyes. The Gladstone Ports Corporation (GPC) says there is no link between dredging in the harbour and diseased fish found in the area.

ABCNews states that GPC chief executive Leo Zussino, says the port follows strict water quality monitoring guidelines and it is confident of the results.

He says the State Government needs to get to the bottom of the issue as quickly as possible.

"What we are hoping is that agencies who have brought on this ban would have their scientists working 24/7," he said.

"It is certainly very damaging to the Gladstone Ports Corporation to have these assumptions made when we can see there is absolutely no link between dredging and diseased fish in the Gladstone harbour."

However, toxicologist and environmental physician Dr Andrew Jeremijenko says the Government needs to be up-front with people living in and around Gladstone.

Dr Jeremijenko says he believes dredging may have something to do with the marine life problems.

"The Government is scared to stop this activity," he said.

The state Member for Gladstone, Liz Cunningham, says the Government must consider compensating Gladstone anglers affected by the temporary fishing ban.

Premier Anna Bligh says it is too early to consider compensation for commercial fisherman in Gladstone.

But Mrs Cunningham says local fisherman are hurting and need urgent help.

Mrs Cunningham also says families are worried they cannot swim in waters off Gladstone after concerns about the sick fish.

Queensland Health says there is no need to stop swimming in Gladstone waters.

5m Editor

 

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