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Fishing for Broodstock

by 5m Editor
10 June 2009, at 1:00am

ACHOTINES BAY, PANAMA - Today was the first day fishing for broodstock, and it was my groups day in the boat, with my group partner being Dr Gavin Partridge from Challenger TAFE in Fremantle Western Australia, reports Alex Mhlhlzl.

After approximately an hour of trolling and several hits I hooked a fish, after what seemed like 10 minutes of reeling, I was told it was more like 4-5 minutes, the fish was brought alongside the boat. It was a Yellowfin Tuna, which was unexpected from the way the fish fought.

We spent another 30-40 minutes trawling then we ran the boat back to the facility where the fish was taken by truck back up to the facility. It was injected with some antibiotics and checked for injury before being put into a quarantine tank.

We also started to wean some fish that were on 23-25 days of feeding, this will be an ongoing endeavour to try and get them off of the tuna larvae feed that they are presently on onto a pellet or flaked feed. We have several that we are trying but the results to date have been minor interest from the 100 approx juveniles in the tank but none seem to have taken the feed.

The results on the tank trial were mixed, the airlift system was too powerful and ended up pulling the tuna larvae into the base of the screen filter with almost a 100 per cent mortality on the tanks. The other systems are being evaluated over the next few days with result analysis expected early next week. These larvae have been fed rotifers.

Another one million plus spawning collection tonight with 70-80 per cent fertilisation rate. These fish will be used in some planned trials and experiments tomorrow.

Further Reading

- For more reports and information on this subject visit our IATTC 7th Annual Workshop focus page by clicking here.

5m Editor

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