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Indian Scientists Evaluate Cloned Fish Quality

by 5m Editor
26 June 2009, at 1:00am

INDIA - Indian scientists have begun demonstrating the superiority of cloned fish, chiefly in yield and quality, over regular ones, as well as evolving a blueprint to test their bio-safety.

According to LiveMint, even as genetically modified brinjal—the first transgenic food crop to be available in India—has reached the final stage of field trials, scientists at the Centre for Cellular and Molecular Biology (CCMB), a prominent Hyderabad-based research institution, have taken the first steps to steer genetically modified (GM) fish—now confined to their labs—to Indian plates.

They have begun the process of demonstrating the superiority of these fish, chiefly in yield and quality, over regular ones, as well as evolving a blueprint to test their bio-safety, reports the news organisation.

Though the genetic engineering approval committee has detailed guidelines and protocol for testing the safety of genetically engineered crops, none exists for genetically modified animals.

The fish in question is the popular variety of carp, known as rohu—the most farmed, and among the most widely consumed fish in India. With genetic manipulation, the scientists say they can increase production “manifold” and in half the time that it usually takes for these fish grow to consumable size.

“Each pair of fish lays lakhs of eggs. These modified fish can now lay as many eggs in one-and-a-half years, as the normal fish do in three years,” Lalji Singh, director, CCMB told LiveMint. However, the exact numbers and yield potential would be determined only after the trials were done, he added.

5m Editor