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Aquaculture: the Saviour of Zamfara?

NIGERIA - According to the Food and Agriculture Organisation of the United Nations (FAO), aquaculture can make an important contribution to poverty alleviation, food security and social well-being. Zamfara State recognises this and is already harnessing the potentials.

Fish farming, known as the largest component of aquaculture, is an ancient practice that can provide many profitable opportunities today, writes Imam Imam for This Day. The raising and selling of fish on a commercial basis has proven to be economically successful throughout the centuries.

The world over, fish farming is growing in popularity, says the news report. Increasing recognition that fish is a healthy food, low in calories and cholesterol levels, but rich in protein has increased consumer demand in both restaurants and supermarkets. Consumption of fish products is increasing dramatically.

The role of aquaculture in fighting hunger and poverty and promoting rural development cannot be overemphasised. According to the Food and Agriculture Organisation of the United Nations (FAO), aquaculture can make an important contribution to poverty alleviation, food security and social well-being and already does so in many developing countries.

In others, however, the potential has not yet been fully realised. With an overall growth rate of eleven per cent a year since 1984, aquaculture, including culture-based fisheries, has been the world's fastest growing food-producing sectors for nearly 20 years. In 1999, 42.77 million metric tons of aquatic products (including plants) valued at US$ 53.5 billion were produced, and more than 300 species of aquatic organisms are today farmed globally.

the Fish Site Editor

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