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Science Helps Ecosystem Restoration

by Ellen Hardy
19 February 2008, at 12:00am

WASHINGTON - In Puget Sound, scientists and managers must restore endangered orca populations and Chinook salmon populations as they work to restore an entire ecosystem.

According to HULIQ.com, the needs of these two species present a prime example of how previous single-species strategies do not work in ecosystem restoration.

“The orca’s main source of food is Chinook salmon. And the whales are suffering from malnutrition,” said NOAA Fisheries Scientist Mary Ruckelshaus. “But by increasing salmon production in hatcheries, the whales’ appetites may be fed at the expense of recovering wild Chinook. Releasing large numbers of salmon raised in hatcheries can lead to the decline of wild salmon.”

Ruckelshaus discussed how scientists assist managers with the difficult choices needed to restore the Puget Sound ecosystem during the symposium, 'Embracing Change: A New Vision for Management in Coastal Marine Ecosystems' at the AAAS Annual Meeting in Boston.

To read the full story click here.

Further Reading

- For more news on the AAAS Annual Meeting click here.

Ellen Hardy