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Learn From Chiles Salmon Virus Outbreak

CHILE - A presentation focusing on Chile's infectious salmon anaemia (ISA) virus outbreak in 2008 - and what the Australian aquaculture industry can learn from that - will be a highlight of the Australasian Aquaculture 2010 Conference, which takes place in Tasmania next May.

When ISA hit Chile’s salmon industry – the country’s third largest export industry – Adolfo Alvial was in charge of conducting ISA research and control measures for seafood company Marine Harvest Chile, so had first-hand experience with what was a devastating and extremely costly aquaculture disease.

A biologist from the University of Chile, specialising in marine phytoplankton ecology, coastal zone management and marine ecosystems modelling, Mr Alvial has previously spent 13 years as a director of aquaculture co-ordinating new aquaculture developments such as turbot, abalone, sturgeon, halibut, hirame and Chilean sole. He also initiated an environmental management and certification aquaculture unit.

Mr Alvial spent six years in charge of the Technological Institute of Salmon of the Chilean Salmon Farming Association establishing an environmental/sanitary vigilance system, an integrated management system for the industry, and a food safety and quality programme.

Another key speaker at the conference will be Senior Research Scientist at CSIRO Marine and Atmospheric Research, Dr Alistair Hobday, who will focus on climate change and how that will affect the global aquaculture industry.

Dr Hobday leads the Marine Climate Impacts area within the CSIRO Climate Adaptation National Research Flagship, and has been co-editor of two recent reports on the impacts of climate change on fisheries and aquaculture, and Australian marine life.

The conference will be held in Hobart, Tasmania from 23 to 26 May 2010.
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