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International Interest in Farmed Cod

NORWAY - The underwater camera captures the cod's movement on film. German TV is visiting the National Cod Breeding Centre. The aquaculture research community in Troms is generating international attention.

The cod swim around in large green plastic tanks - and inside the hall breeding work continues almost as normal.
Cameraman Ingo Vollmer views the cod through his underwater camera. The “film stars” were not greatly influenced by the fact they were being filmed.
Stripping of female cod for roe is filmed by the German TV crew, which describe cod as an animal that has changed history.
Atle Mortensen, Head of the National Cod Breeding Programme, explains the breeding process to journalist Volker Artz. To the right are cameramen Ingo Vollmer and Brian McClatchy.

A three-member television crew from Germany is visiting. While the cameramen film above and below the water, journalist Volker Artz explains why they are visiting the National Cod Breeding Centre.

"We are here to film the conclusion of a programme about cod, which forms part of a series we call Animals That Changed History," says Artz, adding that a 45-minute programme would also be made about horses, doves and silk worms.

"The cod has played an important role in history."

He mentions stockfish and the Cod War in the 1970s as examples of cod's influence on history. The TV crew has also visited Lofoten to film the stockfish industry.

Conception

In the presence of the film crew, staff at the Kraknes facility strip the cod of roe and sperm. The German TV crew was extremely pleased to have the opportunity to film this process.

"It's like we are involved in something big," says Artz. "It's excellent to film this, but it remains to be seen if we can fit this into the programme."

The two cameramen then dismount their equipment. The programme will be screen on German and French television in 2009.

International

The TV crew is escorted by Atle Mortensen, who heads the National Cod Breeding Programme. He explains the breeding process and what happens in the different tanks.

"It's great to get visits like this," says Mortensen. "It shows that the research and breeding work we are doing is of interest both nationally and internationally.

Ellen Hardy

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