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New Monitor Could Save Lives

by the Fish Site Editor
09 March 2010, at 12:00am

UK - An innovative new device that could help save fishermens lives by warning of vessel instability is likely to provide a focal point of interest at this years Fishing 2010 exhibition in Glasgow.

The SeaWise Stability Monitor was developed by Scottish company Hook Marine following a major study by the Marine Accident Investigation Branch (MAIB) that showed around 60 per cent of vessel losses at sea are due to foundering or capsizing.

Capsize is associated with a loss of vessel stability and this new device that will be on display at Fishing 2010 provides early warning of the development of a potentially dangerous situation by continually monitoring the roll of a vessel at sea. The development of SeaWise has been sponsored by the UK Sea Fish Industry Authority and has undergone successful sea trials on different types of vessel.

Ken Smith, the managing director of Hook Marine, said: “Perhaps the most significant finding in the MAIB analysis was the fact that while the accident rate in other industries has been declining in recent years, there has been no corresponding reduction in the UK fishing industry.

“We believe the SeaWise monitor will play a vital role in protecting the lives of fishermen and we will be providing demonstrations of it in action at Fishing 2010.”

According to Fran McIntyre, managing director of QD Events, the organisers of Fishing 2010, there has been an excellent level of interest in the show with over 75 per cent of stand space now snapped up.

“We have introduced a number of new elements so as to reinvigorate the event and we are confident it will be one of the best shows for years,” she said.

“The safety of our fishermen is very important and this will be one of the themes of this year’s event.”

Fishing 2010 is being staged from 20-22 May at the SECC in Glasgow. More information at www.fishingexpo.co.uk.

the Fish Site Editor